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4 Tips for Hiring the Best HR Leader

4 Tips for Hiring the Best HR Leader

As the connection between management and employees, the Human Resources department helps set the tone for employee morale at your company. Selecting the best person for each role has a far-reaching positive impact on accomplishing your corporate goals. Consider these four areas when recruiting an HR professional.  

Determine Essential Strengths

You need to know exactly what it takes for someone to succeed in the HR function at your organization, or you won’t be able to find the right person. Most likely you are looking for more than just someone who can locate the best W2 generator, so think critically about the most important technical and interpersonal strengths the position requires. Neutrality may be one overlooked but crucial trait. A person working in HR must be both a representative of the company’s mission and an advocate for employees. The ability to listen with an open mind to both sides and resolve issues judiciously upholds the perception that HR can be trusted by both management and employees.

Clearly Communicate the Job Requirements

When you  come up with a list of key skills, create a job description. Make sure it doesn’t include outdated requirements and aligns with what qualifications it takes to do the job well. Then you can formulate a job listing that connects you to suitable candidates. Remember that HR professionals are already insiders to the hiring process who anticipate clearly communicated expectations from a potential employer. Be realistic and honest about what a typical day looks like, avoiding company-specific jargon and clichés. Make sure the job title is not misleading, such as using the word specialist for a position that is really more of a generalist. When a listing contains very specific duties and responsibilities, you will attract applicants who believe they have the experience, instead of possibly filtering out strong candidates because they believe they can’t meet the long list of requirements.

Understand What Candidates Seek

By listening to what candidates want that that seem, to you, to be an ideal fit, the inconvenience and waste of time and money of hiring the wrong person may be avoided. Longevity from an employee is more likely when they are the right fit. Does the position have the growth potential to match their career goals? Do they enjoy doing the majority of what the job entails? Be sure to build in time during the interview process to have a dialogue about what their ideal position looks like and make room for them to ask lots of questions. Treat them as someone you are having a conversation with instead of it being just a one-sided question and answer session.

Look for Cultural Compatibility

People who feel like they fit in with their environment will be more productive and happy, so knowing if a personality will mesh with your company culture is important. And HR leaders are captains of the company culture. Their job is to maintain a positive working environment for all employees. So ask yourself if this person is one  who will be on board with the pace of work? Will the employees find this person approachable? For those that you are considering making an employment offer, invite them to spend time with other team members in a variety of situations. This can be one-on-one meetings, an informal lunch with a group of employees, or even have them sit in on a department meeting.

A list of skills and professional accomplishments may tell you what a candidate is capable of, but it won’t necessarily assure whether they will be happy leading HR for your business. Take the time to make sure the position is clearly communicated and an applicant can not only do the job but also excel in the environment. This will help you hire and retain the right HR professional.

About the Author

Robert CordrayRobert Cordray is a former business consultant and entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience and a wide variety of knowledge in multiple areas of the industry such as corporate leadership, employee engagement, workplace culture and entrepreneurship. Robert earned a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) from the University of Chicago. He currently resides in the Southern California area and spends his time helping consumers and business owners alike try to be successful. When he’s not reading or writing, he’s most likely with his beautiful wife and three children.

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